proslavery arguement reconsidered
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proslavery arguement reconsidered

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Published by Bobbs-Merrill in Indianapolis .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

Reprinted from The Journal of Southern History, Vol. XXXVII, No. 1, February, 1971.

Statementby David Donald.
SeriesBobbs-Merrill reprint series in history -- H-384
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19096734M

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  Tise chronicles a constant stream of books, articles, pamphlets and sermons―his chapter on the growth of proslavery arguments by clergy, usually derived from narrow interpretations of Scripture, is illuminating―and builds to a remarkable and probably controversial exploration of the 'proslavery Republicanism,' which he sees as the full flowering of the conservative Federalist Cited by: THE PROSLAVERY ARGUMENT REVISITED 81 by the adventures of two redoubtable champions of slavery, James H. Hammond and George Fitzhugh. In , Hammond at-tempted to draw the patron of reform, Lewis Tappan, into an argument about the merits of slavery by sending him a copy of Letters on Slavery. Tappan refused the engagement with the ex-. The Pro-Slavery Argument, as Maintained by the Most Distinguished Writers of the Southern States by Harper, William , Hammond, James Henry and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at Proslavery book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. Revision of thesis (Ph. D.)--University of North Carolina, /5(7).

This book tells the untold story of the fight to defend slavery in the British Empire. Drawing on a wide range of sources, from art, poetry, and literature, to propaganda, scientific studies, and parliamentary papers, Proslavery Britain explores the many ways in which slavery's defenders helped shape the processes of abolition and emancipation.   Teacher’s Note. While under the Common Core Standards Cannibals All! qualifies as an informational text, it is first and foremost a passionately argued piece of persuasive writing. Published in Richmond, Virginia, in , and aimed at both Northern and Southern readers, it sought to claim for the South the moral high ground in the increasingly fierce national debate over slavery.5/5(2).   Today’s historians are more sympathetic to his argument that the Constitution made possible the expansion of slavery in the early United States. According to Ibram X. Kendi, author of the National Book Award–winning Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America (), the Constitution “enshrined the power.   Historian Larry E. Tise challenged this common belief about proslavery arguments. He demonstrated that arguments to the effect that slavery was a “positive good” arose before the rise of abolitionism during the s. They did not spring up suddenly in response to .

  Tise chronicles a constant stream of books, articles, pamphlets and sermons—his chapter on the growth of proslavery arguments by clergy, usually derived from narrow interpretations of Scripture, is illuminating—and builds to a remarkable and probably controversial exploration of the 'proslavery Republicanism,' which he sees as the full flowering of the conservative Federalist 3/5(1). Community Reviews. An outstanding collection of documents with a great intro essay on the history of pro-slavery thought and its importance in antebellum society as well as its legacies after the Civil War. Main themes are religious, racial, legal, economic, and moral/civilizational justifications for slavery/5. You can write a book review and share your experiences. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. Proslavery Arguments: An Overview. In the decades leading up to the Civil War, sectional tensions between North and South manifested themselves in both popular and political discourse. Even though abolitionism, as a political cause, remained unpopular in the North and South, antislavery literature such as Harriet Beecher Stowe 's Uncle Tom's Cabin.